CFM56 

CFM56-7BTurbofan Engine

18,500 - 27,300 POUNDS THRUST

 

The CFM56-7B is the exclusive engine for the Boeing Next-Generation single-aisle airliner (737-600/-700/-800/-900/-900ER/ BBJ). Military customers around the world are taking advantage of the benefits of CFM56-7B-powered 737 military variants: the C-40 Clipper military transport, the P-8 Poseidon anti-submarine aircraft, and the Boeing 737 AEW&C reconnaissance aircraft.

 

How does a CFM56-7B work?

An inside look at the most successful engine in commercial aviation history.

 

 

CFM56-7BE First Flight

How the best keeps getting better. View the first flight on the advanced new CFM56-7BE scheduled to enter service in mid-2011. 

 

 

Tech Insertion

Introduced as the new production configuration in 2007, learn how CFM56 Tech Insertion is helping operators keep costs low.

 
DOWNLOAD THE CFM56-7B PRODUCT BROCHURE    cfm56-7b.pdf

PROVEN

Since entering service in 1994, the CFM56-7B is delivering on that promise while providing industry-leading reliability. The engine has been able to achieve outstanding rates in very demanding circumstances. For example, Southwest Airlines 737s have one of the highest utilization rates of the fleet and typically accumulate six or seven flights each day.

In total, nearly 8,400 CFM56-7B engines are in service on 737 aircraft, making it the most popular engine/aircraft combination in commercial aviation. More than 190 customers fly CFM56-7B engines and the fleet has accumulated more than 150 million flight hours. The primary factors behind the engine's broad-based acceptance include industry-leading reliability and environmental friendliness, low cost of ownership and world-class customer support.

BREAKTHROUGH

In 2007, CFM breathed new life into the CFM56-7B fleet by introducing the Tech Insertion production standard. Compared to the base CFM56-7B, this new configuration provides operators up to 1 percent better specific fuel consumption over the engine’s lifecycle, and between 5 and 15 percent lower maintenance costs (depending on the thrust rating) through enhanced durability.

All CFM56-7B engines delivered since mid-2007 are in the Tech Insertion configuration, making them compliant with CAEP/6 environmental requirements. Most recently, as of July 2011, all deliveries are in CFM56-7BE configuration. This new production standard provides up to 2% reduction in fuel burn and carbon emissions when coupled with the improved Next-Generation 737.

QUICK FACTS

  • On-wing life enhanced by increased exhaust gas temperature (EGT) margins
  • Reduced fuel burn through advanced thermodynamic cycle
  • Common core with CFM56-5B/P

APPLICATIONS

Boeing 737

AEW&C

P-8 Poseidon

 

 

THE TECHNOLOGY BEHIND THE CFM56-7B TURBOFAN ENGINE

Engine Model
7B18 7B20 7B22 7B24 7B26 7B27
Takeoff Conditions (sea level)
Max. takeoff (lb) 19,500 20,600 22,700 24,200 26,300 27,300
Airflow (lb/sec) 677 696 728 751 779 782
Bypass ratio 5.5 5.5 5.3 5.3 5.1 5.1
In-Flight Performance (installed) (35,000 ft - Mach = 0.80 ISA)
Max climb thrust (lb) 5,962 5,962 5,962 5,962 5,962 5,962
Overall pressure ratio
at max. climb
32.8 32.8 32.8 32.8 32.8 32.8
Max. cruise thrust (lb) 5,420 5,450 5,450 5,480 5,480 5,480
Engine Characteristics
Length (in) 98.7 98.7 98.7 98.7 98.7 98.7
Fan diameter (in) 61.0 61.0 61.0 61.0 61.0 61.0
Basic dry weight (lb) 5,216 5,216 5,216 5,216 5,216 5,216
Applications:
737-600 737-600
737-700
737-700
737-800
737-700
737-800
737-900
737-700
737-800
737-900
737-800
737-900
BBJ

HISTORY OF THE CFM56-7B TURBOFAN ENGINE

The CFM56-7B engine is carrying on CFM’s tradition of providing customers with state-of-the-art engines that enable them to remain competitive in the tough international market.

The CFM56-7B was originally developed to provide Next-Generation 737 operators with higher thrust, improved efficiency, and lower maintenance costs than its predecessor, the CFM56-3. Since entering service in 1994, the CFM56-7B is delivering on that promise while providing industry-leading reliability. The engine has been able to achieve outstanding rates in very demanding circumstances. For example, Southwest Airlines 737s have one of the highest utilization rates of the fleet and typically accumulate 6 or 7 flights each day. This reliability made the CFM56-7B-powered 737 the first aircraft in its class to be granted 180-minute Extended-Range, Twin-Engine Operations (ETOPS) approval by the U.S. Federal Aviation Administration. ETOPS is defined as the number of minutes flying time from a suitable airport that a twin-engine aircraft may operate in the event that one engine becomes inoperable. The approval gives operating airlines far greater route-scheduling flexibility.

 

In 2007, CFM breathed new life into the CFM56-7B fleet by introducing the Tech Insertion production standard. Compared to the base CFM56-7B, this new configuration provides operators up to 1 percent better specific fuel consumption over the engine’s lifecycle, and between 5 and 15 percent lower maintenance costs (depending on the thrust rating) through enhanced durability. The engine also meets current International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) CAEP/6 environmental standards.

And now, CFM is preparing for the mid-2011 entry into service of another upgrade – the CFM56-7BE engine. The enhanced CFM56-7BE-powered Next-Generation 737 airplane/engine combination will provide a 2 percent improvement in fuel consumption, which in turn equates to a 2 percent reduction in carbon emissions. Additionally, the -7BE will provide up to 4 percent lower maintenance costs depending on thrust rating.

CFM56-7B TIMELINE

Milestone Date Milestone Date
Program launch January 1994 737-800 entry into service April 1998
First engine to test May 1995 737-600 entry into service October 1998
Flight test engine on 747 FTB January 1996 737-900 entry into service May 2001
Engine certification October 1996 CFM56-7B Tech Insertion enters service June 2007
737-700 entry into service January 1998 CFM56-7BE engine enhancement program launch April 2009

DID YOU KNOW?

The enhanced CFM56-7BE-powered Next-Generation 737 airplane/engine combination provides a 2 percent improvement in fuel consumption, which in turn equates to a 2 percent reduction in carbon emissions. Additionally, the -7BE provides up to 4 percent lower maintenance costs depending on thrust rating. 

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