CFM Statement on Southwest Airlines Flight 1380

April 18, 2018

CFM Statement on Southwest Airlines Flight 1380

UPDATE: April 18, 2018 – Published 12:09 p.m. EDT

GE and Safran Aircraft Engines technicians (about 40 in total) are being deployed to support Southwest Airlines’ (SWA) accelerated inspection program related to the CFM56-7B engine, which powers most of the airline’s Next-Generation 737 fleet.  Out of an abundance of caution, the ultrasonic inspections are being conducted on a population of fan blades.

Working with Boeing, GE and Safran Aircraft Engines, SWA expects the accelerated inspections to be completed over the next 30 days.

The CFM56-7B engine is produced by CFM International, a 50/50 joint company of GE and Safran Aircraft Engines.

CFM has sent a team of technical representatives to the site to assist the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) in its investigation of Tuesday’s event involving a CFM56-7B engine on a SWA Boeing 737-700 during a flight from New York to Dallas.  CFM will support the NTSB and Southwest Airlines in determining the cause of the accident. CFM and its parent companies, GE and Safran Aircraft Engines, will make every resource necessary available to ensure support.

By law, CFM cannot provide information about the accident or details related to it.  You may contact the NTSB for updates.

The members of the CFM Team worldwide wish to extend their deepest condolences to the family of Jennifer Riordan and every one impacted by this tragedy.

 

April 17, 2018 – Published 3:46 p.m. EDT

On Tuesday at approximately 11:30 a.m., a Southwest Airlines Boeing 737-700 powered by CFM56-7B engines experienced an engine event during a flight from New York to Dallas.  The aircraft made an emergency landing at Philadelphia.

The CFM56-7B engine is produced by CFM International, a 50/50 joint company of GE and Safran Aircraft Engines of France.

The members of the CFM Team worldwide wish to extend their deepest condolences to the family of Jennifer Riordan and every one impacted by this tragedy.

CFM has sent a team of technical representatives to the site to assist the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) in its investigation.   The NTSB is leading the accident investigation according to the ICAO Annex 13 rules, CFM cannot provide information about the accident or details related to it.

CFM will support the NTSB and Southwest Airlines in determining the cause of the accident and CFM and its parent companies, GE and Safran, will make every resource necessary available to ensure support.

The CFM56-7B engine powering this aircraft has compiled an outstanding safety and reliability record since entering revenues service in 1997 while powering more than 6,700 aircraft worldwide. The engine family has accumulated more than 350 million flight hours as one of the most reliable and popular jet engines in airline history.

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Jamie Jewell




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Charles Soret




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Rick Kennedy




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